Texture Collage

tree002It’s been a busy year so we’re a bit behind on our posts. We did this project back in October, when it was actually fall, but we’re only getting a chance to share it now. And here we go:

Frottage is such a fun way for kids to learn about textures.

1) First the kids had to learn the name of textures so, we created various textures inside very large bottle caps  (we used sand paper for rough, some plastic drawer liner for bumpy etc etc)  and used them in a game. We put 1 bottle cap at a time inside a bag and the kids had to feel to learn the name of each texture. (Later we created another set of bottle caps with matching textures so that the kids played a  blindfolded memory).

2)  Next, we gave the kids some crayons and some paper and they went crazy and did rubbings on everything and everyone! It’s such a simple exercise and the kids had so much fun doing it! When they were finished we analyzed the textures and gave them a name.

Untitled-23) Finally we began our project:

  • The kids did crayon rubbings again on bits of fall colored paper (except brown).  They had an idea of what worked and what made better textures this time around.
  • Next, tore the paper and  they glued them onto a larger paper to create a background. For this step, we said no scissors.
  • They did the same thing to make the trunk and branches of the tree, this time scissors could be used.
  • The next step was to cut the leaves out of  newspaper and glue that onto their tree
  • It was a bit hard to see the tree and leaves, so we also got in a little practice shading.  The kids had to outline the tree and leaves using colored pencils, shading darkest on the outside and getting lighter towards the center.  This was probably the hardest part.
  • The last step was to cut out the letters f-a-l-l- and sponge paint them on.

Among the games we did to learn textures was to do this word search.  Inside the circles the kids had to frottage textures – which didn’t work for all the textures.  I think if we to redo this we might just draw pictures of things with those textures.

Texture wordsearch

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Santa Claus is Coming to Town

Christmas is a great time to learn some music and have fun learning to read and write.  Santa Claus is Coming to Town is great, because aside from it being fun, most of the language is pretty simple and easy to explain using pictures or miming.  This is also a great opportunity for the kids to get some reading and writing in since they already know the vocabulary.

We played Sentence Scramble and Dictation – 2 fun games that require movement and if played in teams, requires team work.

Santa Claus is Coming to Town dictationTo play Sentence Scramble:

  • print out a copy of the lyrics.
  • cut each sentence into strips and then cut (separate) each word
  • take 9 envelopes and label them 1 to 9 (use pens the same color as the sentences, that way if any of the words gets lost or mixed up, you know which envelope it goes into) and put 1 sentence in per envelope

Sentence Scramble requires 6 or less players or 6 or less teams.  Each team or player will need 1 pencil and 1 sheet of paper.  Place envelopes at the front of the room.

Object of the game:  to be the first person to unscramble all the sentences.

Rules when playing with individual players:  1. each player should run up and grab and envelope (not necessarily in numerical order) 2. write down the number on the envelope, open it and unscramble the sentence (if the kids have problems, I hum the song for them) 3. write the sentence correctly and then show the teacher 4. if the sentence is correct, he/she should put the sentence back into the envelope and grab another one and unscramble the next sentence.

Rules for playing in teams:  1. have teams sit together.  2. Assign a team member to be the runner and to be a writer.  3. On go, the runners run and get the envelope, the whole team works together to unscramble the sentence 4. the writer writes the sentence correctly and shows it to the teacher.  5. if the sentence is correct, the runner puts the sentence back into the envelope and a new runner and writer are assigned and the game goes on until all the envelopes are unscrambled.  The first team to unscramble all the sentences wins.

To play Dictation:

  • print a copy of the lyrics
  • cut each sentence into strips

Dictation is best played in 6 or fewer teams.  Each team will need 1 pencil and eraser and 1 sheet of paper.  Tape each sentence face down (or face up on a table, but in a way that the teams can’t see what is written).

Rules when playing with individual players:  1. each team is assigned a Writer and the rest of the team members are Runners (keep groups small or too many kids will be running around) 2. the Runners run up to a sentence, memorize it and how it is spelled, runs back to the writer and dictates the sentence.  3.The Writer writes down the sentence and the Runners must run back and forth making sure the sentence is correct, including spelling. 4. when a team is finished, the writer shows the sentence to a teacher, if the sentence is correct, someone else becomes the Writer and the game keeps going until all the sentences are written down.  The first team to correctly dictate and write down the sentences wins. The sentences should always stay at the front of the room and the pencils and papers should always stay with the writers (sometimes the kids try and cheat and bring these things together, but that really defeats the point of the game, doesn’t it 🙂

This game can also be played with individual players, each player must leave the sheet of paper at his/her desk. First he/she runs and memorize as much of a sentence as possible, runs back and writes it down.  Word order and spelling must be correct.

These two games can be played with more than just songs, you can create your own by using text from stories, when learning grammar or for just about anything you want.

A Christmas Tree Craft For Your Crafty Christmas Tree

IMG_2365Just in time for Christmas, another decoration for your tree – and you can recycle to boot!

4 pics1. Supplies:

  • recycled wrapping paper, newspapers or magazines cut into 1 cm x 5 cm strips
  • glue
  • scissors
  • 1/2 circle cut out of construction paper (about15 diameter)
  • yarn

optional:

  • yellow paper for a star
  • glitter

Step 2: Glue half circle into cone shape.  Squirt a line of glue along the bottom ridge and stick the strips of paper (decorated side down) onto the cone.

Step 3:  Once you have covered the whole bottom part of the cone with strips of paper, put another line of glue on the cone, just above the strips of paper.  Now, pull the strips of paper up and glue down (will form a loop shape).

Step 4: Keep on gluing the tiers of loops until you’ve covered the whole cone.

Step 5:  Tie a short length of yarn into a loop and poke the yarn out of the top of the tree.  (Make sure you tie a big enough knot so that the yarn doesn’t slip out).

Optional:

Step 6: Cut out 2 small stars, put some on some glue, sandwich the yarn and the tip of the tree between the 2 stars and glue closed.  This will help fix the yarn to the tree and keep it from slipping out.

Step 7: Add on your decorations.  We hole punched some sparkly craft foam and glued them on.  You could also put dots of  onto the ‘branches’ and sprinkle on some glitter.

You are finished -now you have a really cool tree to hang on your Christmas tree.

Jumping Clown

Per leggere questo in italiano, cliccate qui.

This week’s workshop was Circus Fun – so we made a Jumping Clown (also called a Jumping Jack).  The vocabulary for this project was body parts and to jump, so we sang the Hokey Pokey before getting started.  Here’s a cute and funny version of the song:

To make the clown here is what you will need:

  • clown template
  • construction paper
  • yarn
  • pencil
  • pens
  • glue
  • hole puncher
  • brads (aka paper fasteners) click on the link if you don’t know what they are
Step 1: Print off the body parts and cut them out.
Step 2: Trace template pieces onto construction paper.
Step 3: Cut out each piece.
Step 4: Decorate your clown’s close and draw a face
Step 5: Glue your clown’s hair on.

Step 6: Glue the hat to the clown’s head.  Glue the head to the clown’s body.

Step 7: Punch 2 holes  into the arms and legs as indicated on the template.  Punch holes on the clown’s body at shoulder and hip level.

Step 8:  Line the bottom hole an arm or leg with the corresponding hole in the body, insert a brad and open.  Do the same for all appendages.

Step 9: Thread a long piece of yarn through the top hole of each appendage and tie a knot at the bottom.

Step 10: Your clown is ready.  Pull on the string and watch him (or her) jump!

10 Fat Turkeys and a Craft

Per leggere questo post in italiano cliccate qui.

This workshop was all about Thanksgiving, so we read 10 Fat Turkeys, a silly story just right for the occasion.  It’s a great ESL book – it’s simple, there is some counting and some rhyming and it’s just great all around fun.   And, what better craft to do than a gobble gobble wibble wobbling turkey:

Supplies:

  • construction paper
  • an empty thread spool (we didn’t have any- ours is jimmy-rigged, you can read the explanation lat the bottom)
  • a straw
  • paperclip
  • 2 rubber bands
  • goggly eyes
  • tape
  • colored pens

Here’s what you do:

Step 1: Trace your hand onto the construction paper.

Step 2:  Color and decorate your hand like a turkey (don’t forget the beak and the red wobbly thing on the nose).

Step 3:  Cut out your turkey (make sure that the bottom part of the turkey is flat) and glue on the googly eyes

Now comes the hard part:

Step 4:    Cut a piece of straw about 2.5cm longer than the spool. Put the paper clip onto one of the rubber bands and thread the rubber band into the straw (you may need a skewer or toothpick to help you do this).

Step 5:  Thread the straw/rubber band/ paperclip through the spool. Push through until the end of the straw with the paperclip is flush with the spool.

** MacGyver’d spool: we didn’t have any spools, so we used an awl to punch holes into milk bottle caps.  We took old paper towel rolls and cut them about the size of spools and glued the caps onto each end. Tadah -our makeshift spools.**

Step 6:  Secure the paperclip to the spool with a piece of tape.

Step 7:  Punch a hole into the FRONT of the turkey and slide it onto the straw/spool contraption.  Cut another piece of straw about 5cm long and through the rubber band.

Step 8:  Wind it up and watch your turkey wobble.

Thanks to Heather Swain Books for this fab idea!